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East Meets West in the Garden

East Meets West in the Garden

Thank you to all who contributed to the King County Master Gardener Program and participated in the September 11 East Meets West in the Garden event with Dan Hinkley and Nita-Jo Rountree. These local garden celebrities generously donated their time to help the Master Gardener Foundation of King County raise funds for the Master Gardeners.

Over 165 Master Gardeners and friends of Master Gardeners attended this event, helping the Foundation to raise over $7600 for its continuing support for this program. We recognize additional support from individual and businesses who sponsored the event with generous donations for door prizes made this a fun and well-attended event. Read more about the event and Dan and Nita-Jo.

The 600 plus Master Gardeners require a strong support system. The Foundation finances demonstration gardens throughout King County that in turn offer harvested goods to local food banks for their underserved communities. Classes help gardeners successfully to grow their own food sharing ideas for fruits and vegetables easily planted on balconies and in yards, on sunny windowsills or in doorway pots. Finally, at clinics they share science-based information to help create sustainable and ecologically robust gardens in homes and communities throughout King County.

Gardens continue to be a place of solace in these challenging times. Community support through these generous donations help Master Gardeners to be there today when we all need help, when a kind word of encouragement about a struggling plant sets us on our way, and tomorrow when a new normal still includes time spent in nature in our green places. You may still donate to the Foundation at MGFKC.org and find us online at ask-a-MG.

Cedar Flagging

Cedar flagging is a natural process that is often confused with a disease.  Evergreen plants, including conifers and broad leaf types, naturally shed some old foliage each year. Stress factors, such as insufficient water, hot winds, construction damage or other root disturbance, poor planting procedures, or recent planting can promote flagging.  It is being seen more often this year because it is more common when there is hot weather followed by cold weather.

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WSU Ext Pubs website

We are all aware of the unintended consequences resulting from WSU upgrading their WSU Extension publication website and the adoption of a new web-based store platform for the Extension publications. Changes have recently been made to their new website. It is now possible to download copies of the free PDF publications without setting up an account.

Use the Download Now link for the digital version of a publication to access and download available PDF files.WSU Ext Publications Download Now feature

 

 

 

 

 

To purchase hard copy versions of publications, you will be asked to set up an account. Use the ADD TO CART button to begin that process.

WSU Ext Publications Add to Cart feature

 

 

 

 

 

NOTE: Hortsense and Pestsense links are not affected at this time. Links on the Gardening in Washington State site, http://gardening.wsu.edu/, have been updated.

The URL for that new WSU publications platform is:  http://pubs.extension.wsu.edu

We will continue to work to make access easier and more readily available to King County Master Gardeners in our clinics, gardens and at other events. Watch this website for these updates. [Oct. 22, 2019]

New Program Coordinator Announced

King County Master Gardener Program

 

Today’s message from our King County Interim Coordinators:

Fellow Master Gardeners,

We are very happy to announce on behalf of Todd Murray, WSU Agriculture and Natural Resources Unit Director, that we have successfully recruited Mary Watts as the new WSU King County Master Gardener Program Coordinator.  Her first day of work will be November 1, 2019.

Mary said:

I joined the Master Gardener program with the 2017 class of Interns and have been part of the Woodland Park Zoo Clinic in Seattle since that time. I love everything about the Master Gardener program and am thrilled to now make it my vocation.

I am deeply grateful to Penny Kriese and Carrie Hill for their leadership and hard work as interim co-coordinators and look forward to collaborating with them and all of you as we continue to develop and steward the Master Gardener program of King County.

We welcome Mary and look forward to working with her over the next several weeks as we make this transition in leadership. She will be joining us at the Recognition Event on October 27 at Bellevue Botanical Garden.

Carrie & Penny

[October 22, 2019]

WSU Master Gardener Volunteer Week

2018 Master Gardener Volunteer Week

Congratulations WSU Master Gardeners!

Governor Jay Inslee proclaimed September 22 – 28, 2019, as Washington State University Master Gardener Volunteer Week. The Governor commended WSU Master Gardeners for being the model of service emulated in all fifty states and numerous foreign countries. The program, founded by WSU, has been in place since 1973. He asked all citizens to join him in this special observance.

Read the Governor’s proclamation.

Vision, Mission and Values

The WSU Master Gardener program has recently reviewed and revised its Vision and Mission and developed values that are important to our program.

  • Our vision describes where we want to be in 10 years.
  • Our mission describes who we are, what we do and the value our work provides to the communities we serve.
  • Our values describe attributes, traits and behaviors that are important to the WSU Master Gardener program.

When considering long term projects, short term goals and daily tasks, use our vision, mission and values statements to guide your decision making. Ask yourself, how does this project help achieve our vision; how does the task I am working on right now align with our vision and mission; how do my behaviors and the things that are important to me align with our program’s values? Be certain that everything you do helps to achieve our vision, maintains our mission and aligns with our values to help lead our program into the next decade.

Read the WSU MG Vision Statement

Fasciation

Fasciated CelosiaSome of the most popular new variations of recent plants are mutations that cause the stem and other plant parts to grow wide and flats. Also, shoots can appear to be composed of several fused parts, flattened, elongated or misshapen flower heads with numerous flowers. This is called fasciation.

Fasciation can occur in just about any kind of plant. Everything from weeds to trees will produce this unusual growth given the right circumstances. Gardeners who love oddball plants have propagated some of these rarities. Grafting or cutting propagation is the usual means by which horticulturists propagate fasciated plants. Fasciation is especially common in cacti and succulents, but willows, cockscomb and foxgloves also frequently show this abnormality. Continue Reading »

Mason Bee Habitat Measurements

See additional resources at the bottom of this post.

From 3/8th inch Plywood – “Cut and Assemble

2 ea 9X8           Sides

1 ea 12X8         Back

1 ea 12X13       Top

1 ea 9X13         Bottom

This “box” will hold “six – ½ gal plastic milk cartons (just cut off the top, making a six inch plastic container)”.  This box will hold about 450 “Roll Your Own” paper Nesting Tubes, enough for about 4000, “Pollinating Bees”.  These Mason Bees pollinate your trees, March-May/June – when nothing else is out to pollinate.  They only live about 100 days, then die, but have laid their eggs for next year’s crop. Continue Reading »

Watch your garden investment grow with trees

Garden investment grown with trees
Trees may not live forever, but they usually outlive the gardener who plants one to leave a lasting heritage. Think carefully about not only the kind of tree you select but also where you put it in the garden.

Along with the hardscape — paths, terraces, fences and garden shelters — trees form the bones of the garden. One of their most important functions is to give scale to a design; they provide the over-story. A mix of trees, shrubs and low plants fosters a plant community that lends richness to our gardens.

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The Garden in Autumn

Planting fava beans at Shorewood High School Culinary Arts Garden – a Youth Education Garden in Shoreline, Washington.

Gardening is a year-round activity in western Washington. That may be a bane or a blessing, depending on your perspective.  The garden year doesn’t end when we pick the last tomato at the end of summer. This quarterly feature will highlight what’s going on in gardens in King County. Our gardens can be productive year-round, yielding vegetables and herbs well into fall and through the winter. During October, November, and December we harvest remaining summer produce, clean up the yard and garden to prepare for winter, and plant cool-weather and cover crops for winter and spring.

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Blue Orchard Bees Mason Bees!

Pollination of food crops is essential to society, for without this pollination service, most fruits, nuts and other foods would simply disappear off our dinner tables.  Today, the world depends on a variety of pollinators to perform this task from a variety of sources: Honeybees and a number of other insects – and the hard working Mason Bee. [Originally posted June 2011]

 

Continue Reading »




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