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MGFKC Newsletter

Feb 2021 MGFKC eNewsletter
MGFKC Newsletter – The Foundation Connection
Read all about what’s of interest in the February 2021 issue!

    • 2021 Master Gardener Advanced Training by MG Clinic Leadership Team
    • Meet the (Board) President by Jim Olson, MGF Board President
    • The Gadabout Gardener: New Year, New Plants by MG MG Bruce Bennett
    • News Shoots: 2021 MG Online Plant Sale
    • Miller Library Selection: Blooming Flowers: A Seasonal History of Plants and People
    • Continuing Education Opportunities
    • What’s Happening News & Updates

more

This newsletter is sent monthly to King County Master Gardeners. Look for it in your email. Miss a past issue? Find it here.

Online Education Series

Learn to be a better gardener and improve your gardening knowledge and skills in 2021. The Master Gardeners in King County are offering a couple of online series that will help new or experienced gardeners better maintain their gardens. These classes also offer continuing education for Master Gardeners as they act as horticultural advisers and serve as resources regarding sustainable gardening for home gardeners.

BDG Workshops.
Bellevue Demo Garden Workshops
These Saturday workshops have moved online in 2021 and feature presentations on a broad range of topics by speakers with expertise in plants and methods that work in the Pacific Northwest. Topics will vary from vegetable to ornamental cultivation to vegetable gardening emphasizing science-based information and techniques. See https://www.mgfkc.org/education/bdg-workshops for workshop topics, dates and links to register.

Growing Groceries.
Growing Groceries logo
This integrated series of classes focuses on learning essential gardening practices to grow your own healthy food. Class content is taught at the appropriate time of year when it can be immediately applied in the garden and covers the major groups of vegetables and cultural strategies. See https://www.mgfkc.org/education/growinggroceries  for details about class topics, dates and links to register.

Heads UP!

2020 September-October Heads Up! Diagnostics Lab Newsletter

Newsletter of the Master Gardener King County Diagnostic Lab

 

Read in the September-October 2020 issue:

  • Ready, Set, Harvest!
  • Fall Turf Care
  • Weather Station: Wildfire smoke helps plants?
  • Nerd’s Corner: Daphne bholua
  • The Birdie Did It!
  • Another Trouble-Making Sawfly
  • Fall for Fall Planting
  • Autumn Pruning for Woody Plants — Don’t!!
  • Raspberries: The Simply Wonderful Fruit
  • Twigga Mortis: When things go awry in the veggie patch…
  • Useful Web Sources!

This newsletter is sent monthly to King County Master Gardeners during the active garden months from March to October. Look for the current issue in your email.

Miss a past issue? Find it here.

Touch Base with Your Tillandsias

TillandsiasYou don’t have to strike out with Tillandsias.  These epiphytes stand out in many shapes, sizes and psychedelic colors.  My local nursery tells me they are a big favorite of the people living in all the new developments in the area because they can grow indoors so easily.   DispIay them creatively: glue a cluster of them to a piece of wood or a single one onto a small piece of driftwood, pop one in a teacup or hang them in various houseplants.

The best location to keep them is in a room with bright, filtered light.  I had a cluster of them for many years playing hardball and refusing to bloom.  I started experimenting with putting a small one outside in the summer hanging on a nail on my east-facing front porch.  It received some early morning sun (on the days the sun came out.)  Otherwise, it just got a good dose of bright light.

Read the full article by Wendy Lagozzino as published in the December 2014 The Dirt, MGF newsletter

WSU Ext Offers Home Horticulture Training

Home Horticulture TrainingLearn to be a better home gardener and steward of the environment this winter with Washington State University Extension’s new online Home Horticulture Training program. Training is open to Washington state residents 18 years of age and older. No gardening experience is needed.

This training focuses on a wide range of horticulture topics taught online by WSU faculty, staff, Master Gardeners, and other regional experts on Saturday mornings from 9 a.m. to noon starting Jan. 9 and continuing weekly through Apr. 24. See the FAQ, Syllabus and the Topics and Schedule for more information.

Those wishing to earn a Certificate of Completion will need to participate in weekly online quizzes, a final, and attend most classes. Homework is expected to average 3-5 hours a week. Completion of this course does not lead to becoming a Master Gardener. If you are interested in becoming a Master Gardener, please consider waiting until our next regular WSU Master Gardener King County Training planned for Winter 2022.

Master Gardeners, you can help promote this online opportunity to meet the increased demand for gardening education. Here is a flyer (for print or to post) to publicize this training to your local community.

Continue Reading »

Message to Our Master Gardeners

From: Mary Watts, WSU Extension Master Gardener Program Coordinator
Subject: Announcements
New! Date: October 5, 2020

This is a much shorter email than usual, just a few announcements.

Continuing Education Opportunity
Join us on Zoom for a presentation by Kevin Zobrist on the signs, symptoms and management of some of the common root diseases we see in the Pacific Northwest…

Growing Groceries
As you know, the Growing Groceries team will launch season 3 of this popular teaching series hosted by our King County program. The series of 12 separate classes is ideal for the beginning to intermediate level veggie gardener. The Growing Groceries team has prepared some simple short messages that you could cut and paste into blogs, other social media and web pages or even emails. You’ll find those messages here: https://www.mgfkc.org/education/growinggroceries/growing-groceries-media. Thank you for helping us out.

Finally, An Announcement from Annamarie Lacrosse
It is with great sadness, I wish to report the passing of long time Master Gardener, Edward L. Lacrosse on August 15, 2020. Ed completed his Master Gardener Training in 1991 and was active for 25 years in a variety of roles! He served King County Clinics, plant sales and became a Board member and President of the King County MG Foundation in the 1990s. In 2008, the State Foundation Distinguished Service Award was renamed the Edward Lacrosse Service Award in recognition of his commitment, involvement and service. Ed was honored as the MG Gardener of the Year in 2010. Remembrances may be directed to BonneyWatson.com or “Celebrate the Life of Ed Lacrosse” on Facebook…

In closing, it is always difficult to learn of the passing of one of our community members. It is a reminder to enjoy and appreciate one another, and to take care of each other and ourselves.

Read the full message and all the Program Coordinator’s messages on the Member Area page of this website (log in required).

Dahlias, Dahling Dahlias

dahliaAs an accomplished dahlia grower, we know says, “It is time to fluff your dahlias.” This form of maintenance includes deadheading old blooms, disbudding and debranching, tying the plants to support stakes, controlling insects, and possibly spraying for powdery mildew.

Deadheading (removing spent or declining blooms), along with disbudding and debranching, helps to redirect the plant’s energy to the formation of the new blooms. Disbudding and debranching involve the removal of the new buds adjacent to the new bloom and removal of the new growth of side branching one branch lower. This also helps to build stronger stems and larger flowers. Our dahlia grower said, “The first time I disbudded and debranched, I felt like a murderer . . . but I got over it.” It really does improve the plant and bloom.

The “border” dahlias are usually shorter and don’t generally need to be staked, but taller plants can be somewhat floppy and need to be supported. The stake should be in place by now and the plant can be tied with regular garden twine. Some folks have even eased their dahlia plants into wire tomato cages for support.

Spraying an insecticide in a garden can interrupt the life cycles of the beneficial insects. Give the good bugs an opportunity to do their jobs. A preferred philosophy in the Diagnostic Lab is the opposable thumb method of dispatching most of the troublesome insects in the garden. Literally “rubbing them out” is quite effective.

Spraying a fungicide now will mitigate the inevitable powdery mildew that will become prevalent on your dahlia plants this time of year. Remember, you are applying the fungicide to protect the plant from a fungal infection. Spraying won’t make the existing powdery mildew go away. If you choose to spray, follow the container instructions to spray in continuing intervals until the end of the growing season while your plants still look healthy.

Published in the September-October 2017 issue of Heads UP!

East Meets West in the Garden

East Meets West in the Garden

Thank you to all who contributed to the King County Master Gardener Program and participated in the September 11 East Meets West in the Garden event with Dan Hinkley and Nita-Jo Rountree. These local garden celebrities generously donated their time to help the Master Gardener Foundation of King County raise funds for the Master Gardeners.

Over 165 Master Gardeners and friends of Master Gardeners attended this event, helping the Foundation to raise over $7600 for its continuing support for this program. We recognize additional support from individual and businesses who sponsored the event with generous donations for door prizes made this a fun and well-attended event. Read more about the event and Dan and Nita-Jo.

The 600 plus Master Gardeners require a strong support system. The Foundation finances demonstration gardens throughout King County that in turn offer harvested goods to local food banks for their underserved communities. Classes help gardeners successfully to grow their own food sharing ideas for fruits and vegetables easily planted on balconies and in yards, on sunny windowsills or in doorway pots. Finally, at clinics they share science-based information to help create sustainable and ecologically robust gardens in homes and communities throughout King County.

Gardens continue to be a place of solace in these challenging times. Community support through these generous donations help Master Gardeners to be there today when we all need help, when a kind word of encouragement about a struggling plant sets us on our way, and tomorrow when a new normal still includes time spent in nature in our green places. You may still donate to the Foundation at MGFKC.org and find us online at ask-a-MG.

Cedar Flagging

Cedar flagging is a natural process that is often confused with a disease.  Evergreen plants, including conifers and broad leaf types, naturally shed some old foliage each year. Stress factors, such as insufficient water, hot winds, construction damage or other root disturbance, poor planting procedures, or recent planting can promote flagging.  It is being seen more often this year because it is more common when there is hot weather followed by cold weather.

Continue Reading »

WSU Ext Pubs website

We are all aware of the unintended consequences resulting from WSU upgrading their WSU Extension publication website and the adoption of a new web-based store platform for the Extension publications. Changes have recently been made to their new website. It is now possible to download copies of the free PDF publications without setting up an account.

Use the Download Now link for the digital version of a publication to access and download available PDF files.WSU Ext Publications Download Now feature

 

 

 

 

 

To purchase hard copy versions of publications, you will be asked to set up an account. Use the ADD TO CART button to begin that process.

WSU Ext Publications Add to Cart feature

 

 

 

 

 

NOTE: Hortsense and Pestsense links are not affected at this time. Links on the Gardening in Washington State site, http://gardening.wsu.edu/, have been updated.

The URL for that new WSU publications platform is:  http://pubs.extension.wsu.edu

We will continue to work to make access easier and more readily available to King County Master Gardeners in our clinics, gardens and at other events. Watch this website for these updates. [Oct. 22, 2019]




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