MGFKC Newsletter

2018 March MGFKC e-Newsletter -mini pots

MGFKC Newsletter – The Foundation Connection

Read all about what’s of interest in the March 2018 issue!

  • Bellevue Nursery & Bellevue Botanical Garden Clinics by MG Barbara Picat
  • MG Plant Sale & Garden Market: Pot ‘Em Up by MGs Cleo Raulerson & Tommy Rose
  • Volunteer for the CUH Plant Sale by MG Horst Momber
  • President’s Letter by MG Penny Kriese
  • Gadabout Gardener: Plains Perennials Part 2 by MG Bruce Bennett
  • Easy CE Opportunity: More to Say, Show, Share by PC Elaine Anderson
  • Foodies in the Garden: Purple Veggies by MG Gia Parsons
  • Miller Library: Miller Library: Month-by-Month Gardening in PNW
  • What’s Happening News & Updates


This newsletter is sent monthly to King County Master Gardeners. Look for it in your email. Miss a past issue? Find it here.

Heads UP!

2018 March Heads Up! Diagnostics Lab Newsletter

Newsletter of the Master Gardener King County Diagnostic Lab

Read in the March 2018 issue:

  • Welcome Back – A New Season
  • Gardens Awake!
  • To Mulch or Not to Mulch
  • 2017 Diagnostic Lab Results
  • Twigga Mortis? Wabbit Twacks

This newsletter is sent monthly to King County Master Gardeners during the active garden months from March to October. Look for the current issue in your email.

Miss a past issue? Find it here.

Mason Bee Habitat Measurements

See additional resources at the bottom of this post.

From 3/8th inch Plywood – “Cut and Assemble

2 ea 9X8           Sides

1 ea 12X8         Back

1 ea 12X13       Top

1 ea 9X13         Bottom

This “box” will hold “six – ½ gal plastic milk cartons (just cut off the top, making a six inch plastic container)”.  This box will hold about 450 “Roll Your Own” paper Nesting Tubes, enough for about 4000, “Pollinating Bees”.  These Mason Bees pollinate your trees, March-May/June – when nothing else is out to pollinate.  They only live about 100 days, then die, but have laid their eggs for next year’s crop. Continue Reading »

Propagation Notes

Dividing dahlia tubers

Photo Credit: F D Richards



Spring is a good time to divide established plants, and many herbaceous perennials need to be divided every few years anyway to stay healthy.

Plan to dig on a cool morning, preferably one with cloud cover – not too hard around here.  Continue Reading »


Fasciated CelosiaSome of the most popular new variations of recent plants are mutations that cause the stem and other plant parts to grow wide and flats. Also, shoots can appear to be composed of several fused parts, flattened, elongated or misshapen flower heads with numerous flowers. This is called fasciation.

Fasciation can occur in just about any kind of plant. Everything from weeds to trees will produce this unusual growth given the right circumstances. Gardeners who love oddball plants have propagated some of these rarities. Grafting or cutting propagation is the usual means by which horticulturists propagate fasciated plants. Fasciation is especially common in cacti and succulents, but willows, cockscomb and foxgloves also frequently show this abnormality. Continue Reading »

Watch your garden investment grow with trees

Garden investment grown with trees
Trees may not live forever, but they usually outlive the gardener who plants one to leave a lasting heritage. Think carefully about not only the kind of tree you select but also where you put it in the garden.

Along with the hardscape — paths, terraces, fences and garden shelters — trees form the bones of the garden. One of their most important functions is to give scale to a design; they provide the over-story. A mix of trees, shrubs and low plants fosters a plant community that lends richness to our gardens.

Continue Reading »

Cedar Flagging

Cedar flagging is a natural process that is often confused with a disease.  Evergreen plants, including conifers and broad leaf types, naturally shed some old foliage each year. Stress factors, such as insufficient water, hot winds, construction damage or other root disturbance, poor planting procedures, or recent planting can promote flagging.  It is being seen more often this year because it is more common when there is hot weather followed by cold weather.

Continue Reading »

The Garden in Autumn

Planting fava beans at Shorewood High School Culinary Arts Garden – a Youth Education Garden in Shoreline, Washington.

Gardening is a year-round activity in western Washington. That may be a bane or a blessing, depending on your perspective.  The garden year doesn’t end when we pick the last tomato at the end of summer. This quarterly feature will highlight what’s going on in gardens in King County. Our gardens can be productive year-round, yielding vegetables and herbs well into fall and through the winter. During October, November, and December we harvest remaining summer produce, clean up the yard and garden to prepare for winter, and plant cool-weather and cover crops for winter and spring.

Continue Reading »

Blue Orchard Bees Mason Bees!

Pollination of food crops is essential to society, for without this pollination service, most fruits, nuts and other foods would simply disappear off our dinner tables.  Today, the world depends on a variety of pollinators to perform this task from a variety of sources: Honeybees and a number of other insects – and the hard working Mason Bee. [Originally posted June 2011]


Continue Reading »

WSU Master Gardener Volunteer Week

2015 WSU MG Volunteer Week

Congratulations WSU Master Gardeners!

On May 2, 2016, Governor Jay Inslee proclaimed May 23 – 29, 2016, as Washington State University Master Gardener Volunteer Week. The Governor commended WSU Master Gardeners for their service since 1973, and he asked all citizens to join him in this special observance.

Read the Governor’s proclamation.

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