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WSU Master Gardener Volunteer Week

2018 Master Gardener Volunteer Week

Congratulations WSU Master Gardeners!

Governor Jay Inslee proclaimed September 22 – 28, 2019, as Washington State University Master Gardener Volunteer Week. The Governor commended WSU Master Gardeners for being the model of service emulated in all fifty states and numerous foreign countries. The program, founded by WSU, has been in place since 1973. He asked all citizens to join him in this special observance.

Read the Governor’s proclamation.

Vision, Mission and Values

The WSU Master Gardener program has recently reviewed and revised its Vision and Mission and developed values that are important to our program.

  • Our vision describes where we want to be in 10 years.
  • Our mission describes who we are, what we do and the value our work provides to the communities we serve.
  • Our values describe attributes, traits and behaviors that are important to the WSU Master Gardener program.

When considering long term projects, short term goals and daily tasks, use our vision, mission and values statements to guide your decision making. Ask yourself, how does this project help achieve our vision; how does the task I am working on right now align with our vision and mission; how do my behaviors and the things that are important to me align with our program’s values? Be certain that everything you do helps to achieve our vision, maintains our mission and aligns with our values to help lead our program into the next decade.

Read the WSU MG Vision Statement

MGFKC Newsletter

2019 September MGFKC eNewsletter

MGFKC Newsletter – The Foundation Connection
Read all about what’s of interest in the September 2019 issue!

    • Changes to the Foundation Board
    • Growing Groceries Season Two by MGs Gary Scheider, Linda Shepherd & Penny Kriese
    • Program Update by Todd Murray, Director WSU ANR
    • Your Autumn To-Do List by MG Marty Byrne
    • Foodies in the Garden: Sorrel by MG Marty Byrne
    • Outstanding MGs – Call for Nominations for 2019
    • Miller Library: Garden Revolution
    • What’s Happening News & Updates

more

This newsletter is sent monthly to King County Master Gardeners. Look for it in your email. Miss a past issue? Find it here.

WSU Ext Pubs Site – An Update

WSU Extension has updated its Publications website, and the location for most of the publications we access as part of our work has changed. This change will impact links to WSU Factsheets and Extension Bulletins that have not been updated. Many links on our websites and listed in the clinic resources we share with the public may be affected. Be sure you are using the most updated versions of our handouts.

Here is what you need to know:

  1. The WSU Extension Publications website address for all WSU publications is now: https://pubs.extension.wsu.edu/ . General gardening publications may now be found at https://pubs.extension.wsu.edu/general-gardening .
  2. We are working to update the website addresses and hotlinks in our Puget Sound Tip Sheets. Tip Sheet #2, Gardening Publications, has been updated, and all those links are correct. The QR codes on all our Clinic Resource boxes are no longer valid. We recognize that this is a significant impact to our materials and will be frustrating for you and our clients, please be patient as we work through this transition.
  3. Users will be required to create an account in order to download and access any WSU Extension publications. It is possible to create a Guest account to access the many free downloads and pay for the few publications that are fee-based. We should make our clients aware of this change so they are prepared to create an account when they access the publications at https://pubs.extension.wsu.edu/.
  4. NOTE: Hortsense and Pestsense links are not affected at this time, but links on the Gardening in Washington State site, http://gardening.wsu.edu/, have been updated.

We will continue to update materials over the fall/winter time-period so that we have them in place prior to our 2020 clinic season.

We continue to update links throughout this website and the King County MG website, shortly. [Sept. 6, 2019]

Heads UP!

2019 September-October Heads Up! Diagnostics Lab Newsletter

Newsletter of the Master Gardener King County Diagnostic Lab

 

Read in the September-October 2019 issue:

  • Bugs of Summer
  • Ahh, Fall!
  • The Lazy Gardener
  • Digging in the Data
  • Spiders
  • Lawn Fertilizing
  • The Scoop on Poop
  • Cool Weather Vegetables
  • Lace bugs vs Lacewings
  • Fall Webworm
  • Weather Station
  • Nerd’s Corner
  • Twigga Mortis: powdery mildew

This newsletter is sent monthly to King County Master Gardeners during the active garden months from March to October. Look for the current issue in your email.

Miss a past issue? Find it here.

Touch Base with Your Tillandsias

TillandsiasYou don’t have to strike out with Tillandsias.  These epiphytes stand out in many shapes, sizes and psychedelic colors.  My local nursery tells me they are a big favorite of the people living in all the new developments in the area because they can grow indoors so easily.   DispIay them creatively: glue a cluster of them to a piece of wood or a single one onto a small piece of driftwood, pop one in a teacup or hang them in various houseplants.

The best location to keep them is in a room with bright, filtered light.  I had a cluster of them for many years playing hardball and refusing to bloom.  I started experimenting with putting a small one outside in the summer hanging on a nail on my east-facing front porch.  It received some early morning sun (on the days the sun came out.)  Otherwise, it just got a good dose of bright light.

Read the full article by Wendy Lagozzino as published in the December 2014 The Dirt, MGF newsletter

Fasciation

Fasciated CelosiaSome of the most popular new variations of recent plants are mutations that cause the stem and other plant parts to grow wide and flats. Also, shoots can appear to be composed of several fused parts, flattened, elongated or misshapen flower heads with numerous flowers. This is called fasciation.

Fasciation can occur in just about any kind of plant. Everything from weeds to trees will produce this unusual growth given the right circumstances. Gardeners who love oddball plants have propagated some of these rarities. Grafting or cutting propagation is the usual means by which horticulturists propagate fasciated plants. Fasciation is especially common in cacti and succulents, but willows, cockscomb and foxgloves also frequently show this abnormality. Continue Reading »

Mason Bee Habitat Measurements

See additional resources at the bottom of this post.

From 3/8th inch Plywood – “Cut and Assemble

2 ea 9X8           Sides

1 ea 12X8         Back

1 ea 12X13       Top

1 ea 9X13         Bottom

This “box” will hold “six – ½ gal plastic milk cartons (just cut off the top, making a six inch plastic container)”.  This box will hold about 450 “Roll Your Own” paper Nesting Tubes, enough for about 4000, “Pollinating Bees”.  These Mason Bees pollinate your trees, March-May/June – when nothing else is out to pollinate.  They only live about 100 days, then die, but have laid their eggs for next year’s crop. Continue Reading »

Propagation Notes

Dividing dahlia tubers

Photo Credit: F D Richards

 

 

Spring is a good time to divide established plants, and many herbaceous perennials need to be divided every few years anyway to stay healthy.

Plan to dig on a cool morning, preferably one with cloud cover – not too hard around here.  Continue Reading »

Watch your garden investment grow with trees

Garden investment grown with trees
Trees may not live forever, but they usually outlive the gardener who plants one to leave a lasting heritage. Think carefully about not only the kind of tree you select but also where you put it in the garden.

Along with the hardscape — paths, terraces, fences and garden shelters — trees form the bones of the garden. One of their most important functions is to give scale to a design; they provide the over-story. A mix of trees, shrubs and low plants fosters a plant community that lends richness to our gardens.

Continue Reading »

Cedar Flagging

Cedar flagging is a natural process that is often confused with a disease.  Evergreen plants, including conifers and broad leaf types, naturally shed some old foliage each year. Stress factors, such as insufficient water, hot winds, construction damage or other root disturbance, poor planting procedures, or recent planting can promote flagging.  It is being seen more often this year because it is more common when there is hot weather followed by cold weather.

Continue Reading »




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